broad peak

Broad-Peak

BroadPeak is the twelfth most elevated mountain on the planet at 8,051 meters (26,414 ft) above ocean level. The exacting interpretation of “Expansive Peak” to Falchan Kangri is not acknowledged among the Balti people.The English name was presented in 1892 by the British traveler Martin Conway, in reference to the comparatively named Breithorn in the Alps.

Broad Peak is a piece of the Gasherbrum massif in Baltistan on the fringe of Pakistan and China.It is situated in the Karakoram mountain range around 8 kilometers (5.0 mi) from K2. It has a summit more than 1.5 kilometers (0.93 mi) long, subsequently “Wide Peak”.

The mountain has a few summits: Broad Peak (8051 m), Rocky Summit (8028 m), Broad Peak Central (8011 m), Broad Peak North (7490 m), and Kharut Kangri (6942 m).

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Babusar Pass

Babusar Pass 13,691 ft

Babusar Pass or Babusar Top(el. 4173 m./13,691 ft.) is a mountain pass at the north of the 150 km. (93 miles) longKaghan Valley connecting it via the Thak Nala with Chilas on the Karakoram Highway (KKH). It is the highest point in the Kaghan Valley that can be easily accessed by cars.

The Kaghan Valley is at its best during summer (months ranging from May to September). In May the maximum temperature is 11 C (52 F) and the minimum temperature is 3 C (37 F). From the middle of July up to the end of September the road beyond Naran is open right up to Babusar Pass. However, movement is restricted during the monsoon and winter seasons. The Kaghan area can be reached by road via the towns of Balakot, Abbottabad and Mansehra.

The mountain ranges which enter Mansehra district from Kashmir are the offshoots of the great Himalayan system. In Kaghan valley the mountain system is the highest of the area including the Babusar top. This range flanks the right bank of the Kunhar, contains a peak (Malika-e-Parbat) of over 17,000 feet (19), the highest in the district. On the mountains the grasslands are also found where Gujars and other nomads migrate during summer for grazing their sheep, goats and other animals. On the northern side there are mountains which are the extension of the same mountain system as that of Kaghan mountains. This range diverges from the eastern side at Musa-ka-Musalla a peak (13,378 feet) (20), which skirt the northern end of the Bhogarmang and Konsh valleys, and sends down a spur to divide the two. Here also, like Kaghan, thick forests are found especially on the higher slopes. Due to extensive exploitation only in unapproachable areas the thick forests are found.

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Raikot Face

Nanga Parbat ( 8125m ) is one of the most beautiful mountains in the world. It has three main faces known as Rupal, Diamer and Raikot face, which are totally different in appearance and shape and their routes start from different valley.

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Fairy Meadows

Fairy Meadows

Fairy Meadows:

Fairy Meadows, named by German climbers (German Märchenwiese, ″fairy tale meadows″) and locally known as Joot, is a grassland near one of the base camp sites of the Nanga Parbat, located in Diamer District, Gilgit-Baltistan. At an altitude of about 3,300 meters above the sea level, it serves as the launching point for trekkers summiting on the Rakhiot face of the Nanga Parbat. In 1995, the Government of Pakistan declared Fairy Meadows a National Park.

Location

Fairy Meadows is approachable by a twelve kilometer-long jeepable trek starting from Raikhot bridge on Karakoram Highway to the village Tato. Further from Tato, it takes about three to four hours hiking by a five kilometer trek to Fairy Meadows.The grassland is located in the Raikhot valley, at one end of the Raikhot glacier which originates from the Nanga Parbat and feeds a stream that finally falls in the River Indus. Since 1992, locals have operated camping sites in the area.

The grassland is surrounded by thick alpine forest. The high altitude area and north-facing slopes mostly consist ofconiferous forest having Pinus wallichiana, Picea smithiana and Abies pindrow trees, while in the high altitude areas with little sunlight are birch and willow dwarf shrubs. The southern slopes are concentrated with juniper and scrubs, namely Juniperus excelsa and J. turkesticana. In the low altitudes, the major plant found is Artemisia, with yellow ash, stone oaks and Pinus gerardiana spread among it. Research has suggested similarities between Pinus wallichiana found in the meadows with a sister species, Pinus peuce, found in the Balkans, based on leaf size. Researchers have found thirty-one species of Rust fungi in the area.

Among mammals, a few brown bears are found in the region, with their numbers declining. Some musk deer, regarded as an endangered species, are also present.

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Nanga Parbat

Nanga Parbat

Nanga Parbat:

Nanga Parbat (literally, Naked Mountain Urdu: ننگا پربت [nəŋɡaː pərbət̪]) is the ninth highest mountain in the world at 8,126 metres (26,660 ft) above sea level. It is the western anchor of the Himalayas around which the Indus river skirts into the plains ofPakistan. It is located in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of the Pakistan and is locally known as ‘Deo Mir’ (‘mir’ meaning ‘mountain’).

Nanga Parbat is one of the eight-thousanders, with a summit elevation of 8,126 metres (26,660 ft). An immense, dramatic peak rising far above its surrounding terrain, Nanga Parbat is also a notoriously difficult climb. Numerous mountaineering deaths in the mid and early 20th century lent it the nickname “killer mountain”. Along with K2, it has never been climbed in winter.

Location

Nanga Parbat forms the western anchor of the Himalayan Range and is the westernmost eight-thousander. It lies just south of the Indus River in the Diamer District of Gilgit–Baltistan in Pakistan. Not far to the north is the western end of the Karakoramrange.

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Mazeno Peak

Mazeno Peak

Mazeno Peak

Mazeno Peak is a technical trek into a difficult area where you traverse the southern flanks of the Nanga Parbat massif to cross Mazeno La 5399m a technical glaciated pass of Nanga Parbat’s. The trek has views of Mazeno peak 7100m and four subsidiary 7000m peaks. The trek skirts the southern half of Nanga Parbat massif from the Rupal Gah to Diamir Gah and onto the KKH. This is a technical route where only fit and experienced trekkers with basic mountaineering skills should attempt. Traditionally porters are changed on both sides of the pass which along with the stages charged by porters make it expensive in comparison to other treks.

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Kala Pani valley

Kala Pani valley

Kala Pani valley with its lush green pastures is an ideal camp site for independent travellers. Like other parts of Northern Areas, people in Astore are also fond of playing free style Polo. Astore valley can be reached through Public transport which can be availed from Gilgit/Jaglot on the main Karakoram Highway. Astore travel services and Rama transport company run a daily service from Gilgit to Astore. Astore to Rama can be easily trekked or a jeep can also be hired. The distance from Astore to Rama Lake is 15 Kms. The nearest hotel/accommodation facilities are Rama PTDC and NAPWD Rest House. While travelling to Astore, it is best to register at the office of Deputy Commissioner or Assistant Director Tourism office at Astore. Their offices are situated at district head quarter Eidgah and Gorikot Astore.

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Laila Peak

Laila Peak

Laila Peak is a mountain in Hushe Valley near Gondogoro Glacier in the Karakoram range. Located in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan, it has an elevation of 6,096 metres (20,000 ft). It has a distinctive spear-like shape and its northwest face has a slope of 45 degrees in more than 1500 vertical metres.

It has been climbed by Simon Yates, among others. According to the local people in Hushe, Laila peak has been climbed only twice, a total of only seven people have summited.

It was climbed in winter for the first time by Spanish mountaineers Alex Txikon and José Fernandez, in February 2013.

The height of the Laila peak in Hushe Valley is controversial. Some believe it to be 6200 metres whereas some mention it as 6614 metres. In a Japanese mountaineering map by Tsuneo Miyamori (published in 2003), the height of Laila Peak is mentioned as 6096 metres.

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Shaigiri peak

Shaigiri peak

Shaigiri is a mountain in Pakistan’s western Himalayas. The peak rises precipitously from the south end of the Rupal Valley, soaring 5,584 metres (18,320 ft) above sea level and some 6,500 ft (1,980 m) above the valley floor. To its east stands Rupal Peak, to its west, the iceflows of Rupal Glacier. Despite its impressive height and unique pyramid shape, Shaigiri is greatly overshadowed by its giant neighbor to the north, 8,126-metre Nanga Parbat. Though the peak itself is seldom climbed, its northern base camp (11,989 ft/3,655 m) is a summer destination for travelers, mountaineers and local herdsmen. The peak is highly visible from most of the Rupal Valley. From Shaigiri’s base one can see Nanga Parbat’s Rupal Face and the eastern end of the Mazeno Wall.

Shaigiri is accessible via the Astore Valley, which opens to the great Indus River south of Gilgit. Most treks to Shaigiri, the Mazeno Pass and Nanga Parbat’s Rupal Face are staged from the remote village of Tarashing, which is reached by jeep fromAstore. Astore can be reached by bus or jeep from Gilgit, a major town on the Karakorum Highway.

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